Ammonium nonxynol-4-sulfate

  • Polyethylene glycol nonylphenyl ether ammonium sulfate
  • Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), alpha-sulfo-omega-(nonylphenoxy)-, ammonium salt
  • Ethoxylated nonylphenol sulfate ammonium salt
  • Polyethylene nonylphenyl ether sulfate ammonium salt
  • Sulfated polyoxyethylene nonylphenol
Formula
(C2H4O)nC15H23O4S.NH4
Uses
Surfactant for detergents and soaps, emulsifier for emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate, antistatic agent for plastics and synthetic fibers.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
9051-57-4
RTECS
TR1583600
RTECS class
Primary Irritant
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
(C2H4O)nC15H24O4S.H3N

Hazards and Protection.

Fire.

Health.
Exposure effects
Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea are the most common manifestations of toxicity. Persistent effects may rarely result in dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities, most notably hypochloremic metabolic acidosis. Mild eye irritation is common; some agents will produce more severe irritation.
   Ingestion
Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea are common after ingestion. Oral, pharyngeal and esophageal burns may occur after ingestion of low-phosphate detergents which are generally more alkaline. Colitis, esophageal stricture and irritation of mucous membranes have also been reported.
   Inhalation
Occupational asthma has been reported. Aspiration may result in upper airway edema and considerable respiratory distress. Difficulty in breathing has been described in animals inhaling high concentrations of anionic surfactants.
   Skin
Skin irritation has been reported after prolonged occupational dermal contact. Skin dryness, irritation and contact have been reported after varying degrees of exposure to detergents. Eczema resulted from occupational exposure to surfactants.
   Eyes
Eye exposure to most anionic and nonionic detergents and soaps results in momentary eye irritation with no permanent eye damage. Eye exposure to low-phosphate detergents, which are comparatively more alkaline, may result in eye injury.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Immediately dilute with 4 to 8 ounces (120 to 240 mL) of water or milk (not to exceed 4 ounces/120 mL in a child). SPONTANEOUS EMESIS FREQUENTLY OCCURS following ingestion. If spontaneous emesis does not occur then significant ingestion is unlikely.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required. Treat bronchospasm with inhaled beta2 agonist and oral or parenteral corticosteroids.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and jewelry; wash exposed area with copious amounts of water. A physician may need to examine the area if irritation or pain persists.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of room temperature water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility.

Transport.