Ammonium pentaborate

  • Ammonium borate
  • Diammonium decaborate
Formula
NH4B5O8
Description
Odorless white solid.
Uses
Intermediate for boron chemicals, as a power-level control in atomic submarines (nh4)2b10o16.8H2o.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
12007-89-5
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
234-521-1
Beilstein/Gmelin
111184 (G)
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-1114
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
B5H8NO10
Formula mass
200.08
Density
1.58 g/cm3 (20 C)

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep containers tightly closed in a well-ventilated area away from food products. Keep away from heat and water.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Side-shield safety spectacles; full-brimmed hard hat; goggles; ammonia gas mask.
Respirators
NIOSH approved disposable-type respirator.
Small spills/leaks
Evacuate area and ventilate. Wear protective equipment. If required, use an inert absrobent. Sweep up and place in an appropriate container for disposal. Wash contaminated surfaces.
Stability
No data.
Incompatibilities
Reacts as bases to neutralize acids.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Use appropriate media to suppress exposure fire. Use self-contained breathing apparatus, the boron oxide is quite dangerous. Contain runoff.
Fire potential
Not flammable ammonium pentaborate tetrahydrate
Combustion products
Toxic oxides of nitrogen may form in fire.

Health.
Poison_Class
3
Exposure effects
Significant ingestions or dermal exposures can be associated with weak, rapid pulse, cyanosis and abnormally low blood pressure. The patient may present with reduced body temperature, elevated body temperature or normal body temperature. Headache, lethargy, restlessness, weakness, CNS irritation, and/or seizures may occur with long term or repeated exposures. There is insufficient information concerning the reproductive effects of borates in humans. Adverse testicular effects and infertility have been reported in animals. <br>There have been limited animal studies which suggest decreased ovulation, fetotoxicity and developmental defects may occur with very high exposure levels. Maternal toxicity was present in some studies.
   Ingestion
Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are common. The vomitus and feces may be blue-green in color. Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis can occur.
   Inhalation
Inhalation of dust may result in non-specific irritation of upper respiratory tract. Ingestion of large quantities may produce symptoms of non-specific irritation of the gastrointestinal tract, nausea, vomiting, cramps, diarrhea. Contact with dust causes moderate eye irritation and minor skin irritation.
   Skin
The oral mucosa, lips and throat may be red. Erythematous rash with desquamation (cooked lobster syndrome) may develop on the palms, soles, and buttocks. A generalized rash has also been reported.
   Eyes
See inhalation

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Give large amounts of water or warm salty water to induce vomiting and continue until vomitus is clear; obtain medical attention if abdominal discomfort persists.
   Inhalation
Move from contaminated atmosphere; if respiratory discomfort persists, see a physician.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and wash exposed area thoroughly with soap and water. A physician should examine the area if irritation or pain persists. Observe for systemic effects which chiefly occur from chronic skin exposure, or application of borates to denuded skin. Treatment should include recommendations listed in the oral exposure section when appropriate.
   Eyes
Flush with large quantities of running water for a minimum of 15 min.; obtain medical help if irritation persists.

Transport.
USCG CHRIS Code
APB