Distearyl thiopropionate

  • Dioctadecyl thiodipropionate
  • Thiodipropionic acid distearyl ester
  • Dioctadecyl 3,3'-thiodipropionate
  • Distearyl 3,3'-thiodipropionate
  • 3,3'-Thiodipropionic acid di-n-octadecyl ester
Formula
C42H82O4S
Structure
Uses
Major uses include synergist prc: with primary antioxidants for vegetable oils, placticizer, softening agent prc: thiodipropionic acid, antioxidant (as synergist) for polypropylene, antioxidant (as synergist) for polyethylene, antioxidant (as synergist) for thermoplastics and rubbers, preservative in animal feed, antioxidant (as synergist) for fats.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
693-36-7
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
211-750-5
RTECS
UF8010000
RTECS class
Other
Beilstein/Gmelin
2229929
Beilstein Reference
6-03
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-2227
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
C42H82O4S
Formula mass
683.30
Melting point, °C
68
Vapor pressure, mmHg
1E-19 (25 C)
Heat of vaporization
103.1 kJ/mol

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep tightly closed. Store in a cool dry place.
Protection
Compatible chemical-resistant gloves. Chemical safety goggles.
Respirators
Government approved respirator.
Small spills/leaks
Sweep up, place in a bag and hold for waste disposal. Avoid raising dust. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete.
Stability
Stable at normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Strong oxidizing agents.
Decomposition
Carbon monoxide, Carbon dioxide, Sulfur oxides.

Fire.
Flash Point,°C
324
Fire fighting
Extinguish using Water spray. Carbon dioxide, dry chemical powder, or appropriate foam. Wear self-contained breathing apparatus and protective clothing to prevent contact with skin and eyes.
Hazards
Emits toxic fumes under fire conditions.
Health
0
 
Flammability
0
 
 
Reactivity
0
 

Health.
Poison_Class
4
Exposure effects
Properties of this material have not yet been prepared. Any recommendations are of a general nature. Many chemicals cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract. In severe cases respiratory tract irritation can progress to ARDS/acute lung injury which may be delayed in onset for up to 24 to 72 hours in some cases Irritation or burns of the esophagus or gastrointestinal tract are also possible if caustic or irritant chemicals are ingested. ALWAYS contact your local poision control authority or medical professional for assistance.
   Inhalation
Material may be irritating to mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.
   Skin
May cause skin irritation.
   Eyes
May cause eye irritation.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
1) Consider after ingestion of a potentially life-threatening amount of poison if it can be performed soon after ingestion (generally within 1 hour). Protect airway by placement in Trendelenburg and left lateral decubitus position or by endotracheal intubation. Control any seizures first. 2) Activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. In general, metals and acids are poorly bound and patients ingesting these materials will not likely benefit from activated charcoal. 3) Immediate dilution with milk or water may be of benefit in caustic or irritant chemical ingestions.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required. Treat bronchospasm with inhaled beta2 agonist and oral or parenteral corticosteroids. Respiratory tract irritation, if severe, can progress to pulmonary edema which may be delayed in onset up to 24 to 72 hours after exposure in some cases.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and wash exposed area thoroughly with soap and water. A physician may need to examine the area if irritation or pain persists. Some chemicals can produce systemic poisoning by absorption through intact skin. Carefully observe patients with dermal exposure for the development of any systemic signs or symptoms and administer symptomatic treatment as necessary.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of room temperature water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility.

Transport.