Ethyl aluminum sesquichloride

  • Triethylaluminum sesquichloride
  • Ethyl aluminum sesquichloride
  • Sesquiethylaluminum chloride
  • Trichlorotriethyldialuminium
  • Trichlorotriethyldialuminum
Formula
C6H15Al2Cl3
Structure
Description
A clear yellow liquid.
Uses
Catalyst for olefin polymerization, aromatic hydrogenation, intermediate.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
12075-68-2
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
235-137-7
RTECS
BD1950000
RTECS class
Other
UN (DOT)
3052
Beilstein/Gmelin
4027369
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-7330
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
C4H10AlCl*C2H5AlCl2
Formula mass
247.50
Melting point, °C
-20.0
Boiling point, °C
204
Density
1.092 g/cm3 (20 C)
Viscosity
1.9 cp at 25C
Surface tension
32 g/s2
Heat of vaporization
38.4 kJ/mol
Heat of combustion
-4945 kJ/mol

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Separate from air, water, halocarbons, alcohols store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated location. Outside or detached storage is preferred. Inside storage should be in a standard flammable liquid storage warehouse, room, or cabinet. Aluminum alkyls aluminum alkyls. In undiluted condition. Must be kept under inert gas like nitrogen or argon, and all possibility of contact with water must be avoided. Solution containing not more than 20% of these compd in non-reactive solvents, however, can be handled without risk of spontaneous ignition. Aluminum alkyls in general, toxic materials or that can decompose into toxic components should be stored in cool ventilated place, out of sun, away from fire hazard. Substance must be periodically inspected and monitored. Incompatible materials should be isolated.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Full protective clothing, preferably of aluminized glass cloth; goggles, face shield, gloves wear all purpose canister or self-contained breathing apparatus. Protective clothing and high standard of training in necessary precautionary measures are essential for handling of materials.
Respirators
Wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA).
Small spills/leaks
Do not use water. Keep sparks, flames, and other sources of ignition away. Keep material out of water sources and sewers. Keep material dry.
Stability
Less sensitive to oxidation in air than trialkylaluminums aluminum alkyls.
Incompatibilities
Incompatible with acids and bases Incompatible with oxidizing agents.
Decomposition
When heated to decomposition, it emits acrid smoke and irritating fumes. Decomposition begins at 350 F, releasing alkenes and aluminum by-products.

Fire.
Flash Point,°C
-20
Fire fighting
Do not extinguish fire unless flow can be stopped. Do not use water. Use graphite, soda ash or powdered sodium chloride. Cool all affected containers with flooding quantities of water. Apply water from as far a distance as possible.
Fire potential
Ignites spontaneously in air reacts violently with water to form. Flammable ethane gas. Decomposition begins at 350 F (177 C), releasing alkenes and aluminum by-products. Aluminum alkyls certain polymerization catalysts, such as aluminum alkyls, react and burn violently on contact with water. Aluminum alkyls aluminum alkyls are organic aluminum compounds that are highly reactive and dangerous because of spontaneous burning in air. Aluminum alkyls pyrophoric material in flammable solvent. Vapors are heavier than air and may travel to a source of ignition and flash back. Aluminum alkyls
Hazards
Contact with water from adjacent fires will cause formation of irritating smoke containing aluminum oxide and hydrogen chloride.
Combustion products
Intense smoke may cause metal-fume fever.
Health
3
 
Flammability
3
 
 
Reactivity
3
 
 
Special
W

Health.
Exposure limit(s)
OSHA: PEL (8 h TWA): 15 mg/m3.
Poison_Class
1
Exposure effects
Shock, rapid breathing and pulse, circulatory collapse and other changes to pulse, blood pressure, and respirations may occur. Headache, myalgias, weakness, and paresthesias in both feet have been reported. Fetotoxicity, developmental abnormalities, and possible resistance to hydrogen chloride by inhalation during pregnancy have been noted. <br>No data were available on the possible effects of hydrogen chloride exposure during lactation. <br>No information about possible male reproductive effects was found in available references.
   Ingestion
Gastritis, burns, gastric hemorrhage, dilation, edema, necrosis, and strictures may occur.
   Inhalation
Changes in breathing pattern, irritation, changes in pulmonary function, corrosion and edema of the respiratory tract, chronic bronchitis and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema have been observed.
   Skin
Burns, ulceration, scarring, blanching, and irritation may occur.
   Eyes
Dental discoloration or erosion, bleeding gums, corneal necrosis, inflammation of the eye, eye and nasal irritation, nasal ulceration, nose bleeds, throat irritation and ulceration have been observed.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
The possible benefit of early removal of some ingested material by cautious gastric lavage must be weighed against potential complications of bleeding or perforation. Activated charcoal activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation, bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required. Treat bronchospasm with beta2 agonist and corticosteroid aerosols.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and wash exposed area thoroughly with soap and water. A physician should examine the area if irritation or pain persists. Treat dermal irritation or burns with standard topical therapy. Patients developing dermal hypersensitivity reactions may require treatment with systemic or topical corticosteroids or antihistamines.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility.

Transport.
UN number
3052
Response guide
Hazard class
4.2
Packing Group
I
 
USCG CHRIS Code
EAS
 
Std. Transport #
4916145