Iron(III) bromide

  • Ferric bromide
Formula
FeBr3
Structure
Description
Hygroscopic, odorless, dark red to black crystalline solid.
Uses
Catalyst for organic reactions, particularly in bromination of aromatic compds.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
10031-26-2
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
233-089-1
Merck
12,4060
Canada DSL/NDSL
NDSL
US TSCA
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
Br3Fe
Formula mass
295.56
Melting point, °C
Decomposes

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep container tightly closed. Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area.
Protection
Rubber gloves. Safety glasses. Protective gear suitable to prevent contamination.
Respirators
NIOSH-approved dust, mist and vapor cartridge respirator.
Small spills/leaks
Wear appropriate respiratory and protective equipment specified in Section VIII. Isolate spill area and provide ventilation. Vacuum up spill using a high efficiency particulate absolute (HEPA) air filter and place in a closed container for proper disposal. Take care not to raise dust.
Stability
Stable under normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Sodium, potassium.
Decomposition
Mixtures with sodium or potassium explode violently upon impact.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Non-flammable. Use suitable extinguishing media for surrounding material and type of fire. Use normal procedures which include wearing NIOSH/ MSHA approved self-contained breathing apparatus, flame and chemical resistant clothing; hats, boots and gloves. If without risk, remove material from fire area. Cool container with water from maximum distance.
Combustion products
When heated to decomposition, iron bromide may emit toxic fumes of bromine.
Health
3
 
Flammability
0
 
 
Reactivity
0
 

Health.
Exposure limit(s)
OSHA PEL 1 mg/m3 (as Fe.)
Exposure effects
Iron compounds have varying toxicity. Some iron compounds are suspected carcinogens. In general, ferrous compounds are more toxic than ferric compounds. Acute exposure to excessive levels of ferrous compounds can cause liver and kidney damage, altered respiratory rates and convulsions. The inorganic bromides produce depression, emaciation, and, in severe cases, psychosis and mental deterioration. Bromide rashes (bromoderma), especially of the face, and resembling acne and furunculosis, often occur when bromide inhalation or administration is prolonged.
   Ingestion
May cause abdominal pain, irritability, confusion, tremors, memory loss, slurred speech, anorexia and diarrhea. Large doses may cause damage to the liver and depress the central nervous system.
   Inhalation
May cause sneezing, coughing, difficulty breathing, irritation of the mucous membranes, depression, emaciation, altered respiratory rates, convulsions, acute iron poisoning and in severe cases, psychosis and mental deterioration. Large amounts of iron may cause iron pneumoconiosis. Chronic exposure to bromine is similar to the therapeutic ingestion of excessive bromides. Prolonged inhalation may cause pulmonary edema, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic iron poisoning, pathological deposition of iron in the body tissue, bronchitis and skin eruptions.
   Skin
May cause irritation, skin lesions, acne-form eruptions and measle-like eruptions.
   Eyes
May cause irritation.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Give 1-2 glasses of milk or water, induce vomiting, seek medical attention. Never give anything by mouth or induce vomiting in an unconscious person.
   Inhalation
Remove victim to fresh air, keep warm and quiet. Give oxygen if breathing is difficult and seek medical attention.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing, flood skin with large amounts of water. If irritation persists seek medical attention.
   Eyes
Immediately flush eyes, including under eyelids, with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes. Call a physician.

Transport.