Iron(III) oxide

  • Hematite
  • Haematite
  • Specularite
Formula
Fe2O3
Structure
Description
Red, odorless powder.
Uses
Ore- raw material for iron, pigment for ceramics, paint, rubber, paper, & linoleum, chemical intermediate for ferrites, polishing agent for glass, precious metals, & diamonds, component in electrical resistors, semiconductors, magnets & magnetic tapes, catalyst.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
1317-60-8
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
215-275-4
RTECS
MH7600000
RTECS class
Tumorigen
Beilstein/Gmelin
11-92 (G)
Canada DSL/NDSL
NDSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
Fe2O3
Formula mass
159.69
Melting point, °C
1565
Density
5.26 g/cm3
Solubility in water
Insoluble

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Store dry at ambient temperatures.
Handling
Follow normal laboratory safety guidelines.
Protection
Chemical splash goggles in compliance with OSHA regulations are advised; however, OSHA regulations also permit other type safety glasses. Whre chemical resistant gloves. To prevent repeated or prolonged skin contact, wear impervious clothing and boots.
Respirators
Niosh approved respirator for dusts, mists and fumes.
Small spills/leaks
Handle as normal solid waste.
Stability
Stable at normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Strong oxidizing agents.
Decomposition
None reported.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus in pressure-demand, MSHA/NIOSH (approved or equivalent), and full protective gear. During a fire, irritating and highly toxic gases may be generated by thermal decomposition or combustion. Use agent most appropriate to extinguish fire.
Fire potential
Noncombustible, except as powder. Hematite, red

Health.
Exposure effects
Blood pressure may be decreased following an iron overdose. Lethargy, restlessness or confusion may be seen early in the poisoning. Convulsions and coma may occur in later phases. Case reports of pregnant women who have received early aggressive treatment (decontamination and/or deferoxamine) have described good fetal outcomes.
   Ingestion
Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and gastrointestinal hemorrhage may develop.
   Inhalation
Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema may develop with severe intoxication.
   Skin
Severe thermal burn with ferrous sulfate slurry has caused classical symptoms of ingested iron poisoning.
   Eyes
May cause irriation.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
The possible benefit of early removal of some ingested material by cautious gastric lavage must be weighed against potential complications of bleeding or perforation. Activated charcoal activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
If symptoms develop, move individual away from exposure and into fresh air. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention. If breathing is difficult, administer oxygen. Keep person warm and quiet; seek immediate medical attention.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing. Wash exposed area with soap and water. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention. Launder clothing before reuse.
   Eyes
Diagnosis of iron intraocular foreign body can be done by x-ray, by computerized tomography, by establishing that the foreign body can be moved with a magnet, and by electroretinogram. Magnetic resonance imaging is not recommended as movement of the foreign body may result.

Transport.