Nickel dibutyldithiocarbamate

  • bis(Dibutyldithiocarbamate) nickel
  • bis(Dibutyldithiocarbamato)nickel
  • (Dibutyldithiocarbamato)nickel(II)
  • NBC
  • Nickel dibutyldithiocarbamate
  • Nickel(II) dibutyldithiocarbamate
Formula
C18H36N2NiS4
Structure
Description
Dark green flakes with an amine-like odor.
Uses
Accelerator for rubber vulcanization.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
13927-77-0
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
237-696-2
RTECS
QR6140000
RTECS class
Tumorigen
Beilstein/Gmelin
145496 (G)
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-9016
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
C18H36N2NiS4
Formula mass
467.51
Melting point, °C
86 minimum
Density
1.26 g/cm3 (20 C)
Solubility in water
Negligible.

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Stool in a cool, dry location. Keep containers closed to prevent contamination.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Chemical splash goggles in compliance with OSHA regulations are advised; however, OSHA regulations also permit other type safety glasses. Whre chemical resistant gloves. To prevent repeated or prolonged skin contact, wear impervious clothing and boots.
Respirators
Not normally required. If needed, use NIOSH/MSHA approved dust respirator.
Small spills/leaks
Wear protective equipment. Sweep up and place in container for disposal.
Stability
Stable at normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Strong oxidizing agents.
Decomposition
Oxides of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen.

Fire.
Flash Point,°C
>263
Fire fighting
Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus in pressure-demand, MSHA/NIOSH (approved or equivalent), and full protective gear. During a fire, irritating and highly toxic gases may be generated by thermal decomposition or combustion. Use agent most appropriate to extinguish fire.
Combustion products
Toxic gases and vapors (such as nickel carbonyl) may be released in a fire involving nickel.

Health.
Exposure limit(s)
IDHL: NIOSH considers nickel metal and other compounds (as Ni) to be a potential
Carcinogin
G-A4, I-1, N-1, CP65
Poison_Class
5
Exposure effects
Acute intoxication of nickel carbonyl has two stages, immediate and delayed. A person may have a temperature as a delayed symptom, but it will seldom elevate above 101 degrees. Early symptoms after inhalation are dizziness, giddiness, and weakness. Nickel salts are reported to be animal teratogens. Increased incidence of stillbirth and neonatal mortality of rat offspring were associated with maternal consumption of nickel chloride solutions prior to mating and during gestation. Nickel has been found in breast milk. ORAL ADMINISTRATION of nickel sulphate to rats caused decreased testicular, prostate, and seminal vesicle size as well as abnormalities of sperm and decreased sperm count.
   Ingestion
Large doses taken orally may cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
   Inhalation
Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
   Skin
Nickel contact dermatitis is the most common reaction to nickel. It is estimated that 5 percent of all eczemas are nickel reactions. Nickel itch may begin with a burning and itching sensation, followed by erythema and nodular eruptions. Once acquired, nickel sensitivity usually persists.
   Eyes
Acute toxicity from nickel inhalation includes sore throat and hoarseness. There is speculation inflammation of the eye and epiphora have occurred in nickel plating work environments due to poor ventilation. Occasional exposure to nickel aerosol and other contaminants has resulted in nasal irritation, loss of smell, damage to the nasal mucosa, and perforation of the nasal septum. In rare cases, nickel workers have complained of a bitter metallic taste.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
The possible benefit of early removal of some ingested material by cautious gastric lavage must be weighed against potential complications of bleeding or perforation. Activated charcoal activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
Move the patient to fresh air. The first phase of nickel carbonyl inhalation is deceptive in its lack of severe symptoms. Chelating agents - although penicillamine has an effect, diethyldithiocarbamate (ddc) is the preferred chelating agent in the literature. Collect an 8 hour sample immediately after exposure. Levels of: less than 10 mcg/dl: delayed symptoms are not expected. Ddc is unnecessary.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing. Wash exposed area with soap and water. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention. Launder clothing before reuse.
   Eyes
If symptoms develop, immediately move individual away from exposure and into fresh air. Flush eyes gently with water for at least 15 minutes while holding eyelids apart; seek immediate medical attention.

Transport.