Petroleum Asphalt All Grades

Formula
Mixture
Description
Almost black, thick liquid or semisolid. Characteristic naphthalene-like odor. Contains sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen. A mixture of high molecular weight hadrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
Uses
Raw material for plastics, solvents, dyes, drugs, crude or refined product or fractions thereof are also used for waterproofing, paints, pipe coating, roads, roofing, and insulation, and as pesticides and sealants. Coal tar pitch.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
8052-42-4
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
232-490-9
RTECS
CI9900000
RTECS class
Tumorigen; Mutagen
UN (DOT)
1999
Beilstein/Gmelin
8475717
EPA OPP
22002
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Melting point, °C
>38
Density
0.95 - 1.1 g/cm3 (20 C)
Solubility in water
Insoluble
Viscosity
93.250 cp at 100C

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep container closed when not in use. Keep in a cool, dry, well ventilated location.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Wear loose clothing, in good condition, with neck closed and sleeves rolled down. Hand and arm protection should be worn. Safety shoes should be about 15 cm high and laced. Face and eye protection is also recommended when heated asphalt is handled. Employees shall wear appropriate protective clothing. Including face shield (8-in minimum).
Respirators
Engineering controls shall be used when needed to keep concentration of asphalt fumes below the recommended exposure limit.
Small spills/leaks
Keep sparks, flames, and other sources of ignition away. Keep material out of water sources and sewers. Build dikes to contain flow as necessary. Use water spray to knock-down vapors. Land spill: Dig a pit, pond, lagoon, holding area to contain liquid or solid material. Dike surface flow using soil, sand bags, foamed polyurethane, or foamed concrete. Absorb bulk liquid with fly ash, cement powder, or commercial sorbents. Water spill: Use natural barriers or oil spill control booms to limit spill travel. Remove trapped material with suction hoses.
Stability
Stable at normal temperratures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Incompatible with strong oxidizing agents like nitric acid.
Decomposition
When heated to decomposition it emits smoke, irritating and acrid fumes.

Fire.
Flash Point,°C
163
Upper exp. limit, %
6
Lower exp. limit, %
1
Fire fighting
Whear NIOSH/MSHA approved SCBA and full protective equipment. Avoid using water streams to prevent cooling. Use water spray to cool exposed surfaces. Extinguish using CO2, dry chemical or water spray.
Fire potential
Flammable.
Hazards
Vapors may form explosive mixtures with air. Vapors may travel to source of ignition and flash back. Most vapors are heavier than air. They will spread along ground and collect in low or confined areas (sewers, basements, tanks). Vapor explosion hazard indoors, outdoors or in sewers. May polymerize explosively when heated or involved in a fire. Runoff to sewer may create fire or explosion hazard. Containers may explode when heated. Many liquids are lighter than water.
Combustion products
Fire will produce irritating, corrosive and/or toxic gases.
Health
0
 
Flammability
1
 
 
Reactivity
0
 

Health.
Exposure limit(s)
NIOSH REL: Ca C 5 mg/m3 [15-minute] See Appendix A
Carcinogin
I-2B, CP65
Exposure effects
Headache may occur following prolonged inhalation exposure. Coma and seizures can follow hydrogen sulfide inhalation.
   Ingestion
Bezoars may occur if asphalt is swallowed.
   Inhalation
Prolonged irritation of hot asphalt fumes and release of hydrogen sulfide gas can produce respiratory irritation, pulmonary edema, and hypoxia.
   Skin
Dermal exposure to hot asphalt produces a lesion which resembles a scald injury. The tar tends to adhere to some areas of skin, but may come off in areas where slight bullae are produced. Partial thickness burns are generally observed, but patchy areas of full thickness skin loss are common.
   Eyes
Exposure to hot asphalt fumes can cause severe irritation of eyes and mucous membranes.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Seek medical assistance.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation, bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required.
   Skin
Immerse tar-covered skin in cool water to limit tissue damage and prevent spread of liquid tar. Cooling should continue only until tar is hardened and cool. Tar adherent to skin blisters may be removed along with the blister epithelium in a medical facility. Tar adherent to unblistered skin may be removed in a medical facility using one of these methods. Apply liberal amounts of polysorbate over the affected area, cover with wet dressings and allow to remain for 6 hours. Wash away most of the tar with sterile water or saline. Repeat as necessary.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility.

Transport.
UN number
1999
Response guide
Hazard class
3
Packing Group
II; III
 
USCG CHRIS Code
ARF
 
33 Misc. hydrocarbon mixtures
Std. Transport #
4912361 4910220 4910260 4912003
 
IMO Chemical Code
I
IMO Pollution Category
I