Polyacrylonitrile

  • Acrylonitrile cellulose graft copolymer
  • Acrylonitrile cellulose polymer
  • Cellulose polyacrylonitrile copolymer
  • Cellulose polyacrylonitrile graft copolymer
  • Fiber a
  • Orlon
Formula
C3H3N
Structure
Description
White fiber.
Uses
Fiber suitable for outdoor furnishings (awnings, tents, outdoor furniture), indoor furnishings, anode bag in eletroplating, knitwear, rugs.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
25014-41-9
RTECS
AT6977900
RTECS class
Other
Beilstein/Gmelin
NA
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed

Properties.
Formula
C3H3N
Formula mass
53.06
Melting point, °C
317
Density
1.14-1.17 g/cm3
Solubility in water
Insoluble

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Store in a cool, dry place. Store in a tightly closed container.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Wear protective safety goggles or face shield as described in 29 CRF 1910.133 or European Standard EN166. Skin contact should be eliminated by wearing the appropriate chemical protective gloves annd clothing.
Respirators
Follow the OSHA respirator regulations found in 29CFR 1910.134 or European Standard EN 149. Always use a NIOSH or European Standard EN 149 approved respirator when necessary.
Small spills/leaks
Vacuum or sweep up material and place into a suitable disposal container.
Stability
Stable under normal temperatures and pressures.
Incompatibilities
Strong oxidizing agents.
Decomposition
Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus in pressure-demand, MSHA/NIOSH (approved or equivalent), and full protective gear. In case of fire use water spray, dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or chemical foam.
Fire potential
Flammability similar to that of rayon and cotton combustible; burns freely and rapidly
Combustion products
In presence of air main gaseous product of combustion and thermal decompose (600 C) of orlon is carbon dioxide accompanied by small amt of nitrogen oxides.

Health.
Exposure effects
Headache may be an early sign of cyanide poisoning. CNS stimulation with varied presentations may be seen in the early stages of cyanide poisoning. Coma and seizures are common in severe cyanide poisoning. In one case paralysis occurred, and parkinsonian syndromes have been observed. Rare cases of neurological sequelae have been reported. In experimental animals, related cyanide compounds did cause resorptions, malformations and teratogenic effects in the offspring. <br>No information about possible male reproductive effects was found in available references.
   Ingestion
Nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain may occur after ingestion of cyanide salts.
   Inhalation
Hypoventilation, respiratory tract irritation, or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema may develop.
   Skin
Cyanide has been said to be absorbed through intact skin.
   Eyes
May cause eye irritation.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
The possible benefit of early removal of some ingested material by cautious gastric lavage must be weighed against potential complications of bleeding or perforation. Activated charcoal activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation, bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required. Treat bronchospasm with beta2 agonist and corticosteroid aerosols.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and wash exposed area thoroughly with soap and water. A physician should examine the area if irritation or pain persists. While cyanide can be absorbed through intact skin, most reported cases have involved whole-body immersion in cyanide solutions or large-area burns with molten cyanide solutions. Most nitrile compounds are well absorbed through intact skin, and may cause delayed onset of symptoms following exposure by this route. Treatment should include recommendations listed in the inhalation exposure section when appropriate.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility. Experimental animals have developed serious systemic cyanide poisoning following ocular exposure. Human poisoning cases have not been reported due to eye exposure only. If systemic cyanide poisoning is suspected following eye exposure, refer to treatment recommendations in the inhalation exposure section above.

Transport.