Polypropylene glycol monomethyl ether

  • Dowfroth 250
  • Jeffox ol 2700
  • alpha-Methyl-omega-hydroxypoly(oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl))
  • Poly(oxypropylene) monomethyl ether
  • Polypropylene glycol methyl ether
  • Polypropylene glycol methyl monoether
Formula
(C3H6O)n.CH4O
Uses
Functional fluid & diluent, eg, for hydraulic fluids, water-insoluble lubricant, solvent (possible use), flotation frother (possible use).

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
37286-64-9
RTECS
TR4690000
RTECS class
Other
Beilstein/Gmelin
NA
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
(C3H6O).xCH4O
Density
0.90 g/cm3 (20 C) (liquid)
Heat of combustion
-28.3 kJ/g

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep in a cool, dry, dark location in a tightly sealed container or cylinder. Keep away from incompatible materials, ignition sources and untrained individuals. Secure and label area. Protect containers/cylinders from physical damage.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Wear canister type mask.
Respirators
Use NIOSH/MSHA approved respirator appropriate for exposure of concern.
Small spills/leaks
Evacuate area and ventilate. Wear protective equipment. If required, use an inert absrobent. Sweep up and place in an appropriate container for disposal. Wash contaminated surfaces.
Stability
Stable-vapors can explode when contacted with heat or flame.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Foam, carbon dioxide dry chemical, or carbon tetrachloride.
Fire potential
Moderate when exposed to heat or flame.

Health.
Exposure effects
Abnormally low blood pressure or elevated blood pressure may occur as a result of glycol toxicity. Rapid breathing has been reported with ethylene glycol and glycol ether ingestions. CNS depression, seizures, coma, cerebral edema, and delayed neurologic sequelae may occur following most glycol exposures. CNS symptoms are common following exposures to most glycols. Exposures to glycols have resulted in teratogenicity, specifically craniofacial and neural tube closure defects and skeletal dysplasia in animal studies.
   Ingestion
Nausea and vomiting are frequent early findings.
   Inhalation
Tachypnea, respiratory irritation, and pulmonary edema have been reported following exposure to glycols.
   Eyes
Eye irritation may occur with any of the glycols.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Emesis: ipecac-induced vomiting is not recommended because of the potential for cns depression. Consider after ingestion of a potentially life-threatening amount of poison if it can be performed soon after ingestion (generally within 1 hour). Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
If symptoms develop, move individual away from exposure and into fresh air. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention. If breathing is difficult, administer oxygen. Keep person warm and quiet; seek immediate medical attention.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing. Wash exposed area with soap and water. If symptoms persist, seek medical attention. Launder clothing before reuse.
   Eyes
If symptoms develop, immediately move individual away from exposure and into fresh air. Flush eyes gently with water for at least 15 minutes while holding eyelids apart; seek immediate medical attention.

Transport.
USCG CHRIS Code
PGM
 
40 Glycol ethers
IMO Chemical Code
18
IMO Pollution Category
D