Sulfur dichloride

  • Chlorine sulfide
  • Dichlorosulfane
  • Disulfur tetrachloride
  • Monosulfur dichloride
  • Sulfur chloride
Formula
SCl2
Structure
Description
Dark red liquid. Pungent chlorine odor.
Uses
Chlorine carrier, rubber vulcanizing, vulcanized oils, purifying sugar juices, sulfur solvent, chloridizing agent in metallurgy, manufacture of organic chemicals.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
10545-99-0
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
234-129-0
EC Index Number
016-013-00-X
EC Class
Reacts violently with water; Corrosive; Dangerous for the Environment
UN (DOT)
1828
Beilstein/Gmelin
1878 (G)
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-5985
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
Cl2S2
Formula mass
102.96
Melting point, °C
-80
Boiling point, °C
59
Vapor pressure, mmHg
10.7 (20 C)
Vapor density (air=1)
3.55
Odor Threshold Odor threshold 0.0042 mg/m3
Density
1.6738 g/cm3 (20 C)
Solubility in water
Insoluble
Viscosity
0.958 cp (40 C)
Partition coefficient, pKow
2.88
Heat of fusion
8.25 kJ/mol

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep in a cool, dry, dark location in a tightly sealed container or cylinder. Keep away from incompatible materials, ignition sources and untrained individuals. Secure and label area. Protect containers/cylinders from physical damage.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Wear appropriate clothing to prevent any reasonable probability of skin contact. Wear eye protection to prevent any possibility of eye contact.
Respirators
Self contained breathing apparatus with a full, facepiece operated in pressure demand or other positive pressure mode, or a combination respirator which includes a type c supplied air respirator with a full facepiece operated in pressure demand or other positive pressure or continuous flow mode and an auxiliary self contained breathing apparatus operated in pressure demand and other positive pressure mode.<BR>Only NIOSH approved or OSHA approved equipment should be used.
Small spills/leaks
Wear a fully encapsulating, vapor protective clothing should be worn for spills and leaks with no fire. Prevent contact unless wearing appropriate protective clothing. Stop leak if you can do it without risk. Use water spray to reduce vapors; do not put water directly on leak, spill area or inside container. Keep combustibles (wood, paper, oil, etc.) away from spilled material. Cover with DRY earth, DRY sand, or other non-combustible material followed with plastic sheet to minimize spreading or contact with rain. Use clean non-sparking tools to collect material and place it into loosley covered plastic containers for later disposal.
Stability
No data.
Incompatibilities
Violent reaction with aluminum. A very violent explosion results when a mixture of sodium and sulfur dichloride is struck with a hammer. Interaction of nitric acid with sulfur dichloride is violent, the hydrogen halide being liberated. Interaction of dinitrogen pentaoxide with sulfur dichloride is explosively violent. Exothermic reaction with water or steam. Powdered aluminum ignites in the vapor of sulfur dichloride. Contact with common metals produces hydrogen which may form explosive mixtures with air.
Decomposition
When heated to decomposition it emits fumes of sulfur oxides and hydrogen chloride. Decomposition into disulfur dichloride and chlorine at high temp it decomposition into hydrogen and chlorine hydrochloric acid.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Use dry chemical, dry sand, or carbon dioxide. Do not use water on material itself. If large quantities of combustibles are involved, use water in flooding quantities as spray and fog. Use water spray to knock-down vapors. Cool all affected containers with flooding quantities of water. Apply water from as far a distance as possible. Use water, neutralize with chemically basic substances such as soda ash or slaked lime. Extinguish fire using agent suitable for type of surrounding fire. (Material itself does not burn or burns with difficulty). Use water in flooding quantities as fog. Cool all affected containers with flooding quantities of water. Apply water from as far a distance as possible.
Fire potential
Moderate fire hazard, when exposed to heat or flame.
Hazards
Confined fires with high fuel loads of polyvinyl chloride, such as a fire in a vault with a high load of polyvinyl chloride-coated electrical wiring, may generate sufficient hydrogen chloride to cause irritation in fire fighters. Rapid combustion of relatively large amount of polymer may yield hydrogen chloride.
Combustion products
Fire will produce irritating, corrosive and/or toxic gases. Reaction with water may generate much heat which will increase the concentration of fumes in the air.

Health.
Poison_Class
2
Exposure effects
Shock, rapid breathing and pulse, circulatory collapse and other changes to pulse, blood pressure, and respirations may occur. Fetotoxicity, developmental abnormalities, and possible resistance to hydrogen chloride by inhalation during pregnancy have been noted. <br>No data were available on the possible effects of hydrogen chloride exposure during lactation. <br>No information about possible male reproductive effects was found in available references.
   Ingestion
Gastritis, burns, gastric hemorrhage, dilation, edema, necrosis, and strictures may occur.
   Inhalation
Changes in breathing pattern, irritation, changes in pulmonary function, corrosion and edema of the respiratory tract, chronic bronchitis and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema have been observed.
   Skin
Burns, ulceration, scarring, blanching, and irritation may occur.
   Eyes
Dental discoloration or erosion, bleeding gums, corneal necrosis, inflammation of the eye, eye and nasal irritation, nasal ulceration, nose bleeds, throat irritation and ulceration have been observed.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
The possible benefit of early removal of some ingested material by cautious gastric lavage must be weighed against potential complications of bleeding or perforation. Activated charcoal activated charcoal binds most toxic agents and can decrease their systemic absorption if administered soon after ingestion. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents.
   Inhalation
Move patient to fresh air. Monitor for respiratory distress. If cough or difficulty breathing develops, evaluate for respiratory tract irritation, bronchitis, or pneumonitis. Administer oxygen and assist ventilation as required. Treat bronchospasm with beta2 agonist and corticosteroid aerosols.
   Skin
Remove contaminated clothing and wash exposed area thoroughly with soap and water. A physician should examine the area if irritation or pain persists. Treat dermal irritation or burns with standard topical therapy. Patients developing dermal hypersensitivity reactions may require treatment with systemic or topical corticosteroids or antihistamines.
   Eyes
Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility.

Transport.
UN number
1828
Response guide
Hazard class
8
Packing Group
I
 
USCG CHRIS Code
SFN