Zinc chromate

Formula
ZnCrO4
Structure
Description
Odorless yellow solid.
Uses
Primarily used in priming paints for metals, for which they provide resistance against corrosion zinc chromates.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
13530-65-9
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
236-878-9
RTECS
GB3290000
RTECS class
Tumorigen; Mutagen; Human Data
Merck
12,10262
Beilstein/Gmelin
72603 (G)
RCRA
D007
Swiss Giftliste 1
G-7587
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
New Zealand
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
CrO4Zn
Formula mass
181.37
Melting point, °C
316
Boiling point, °C
732
Density
3.43 g/cm3 (20 C)
Solubility in water
Insoluble

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Ambient.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Wear appropriate equipment to prevent any possibility of skin contact. Wear eye protection to prevent any possibility of eye contact. Chromic acid and chromates (as cro3).
Respirators
Use NIOSH/MSHA approved respirator appropriate for exposure of concern.
Small spills/leaks
Evacuate area and ventilate. Wear protective equipment. If required, use an inert absrobent. Sweep up and place in an appropriate container for disposal. Wash contaminated surfaces.
Stability
Stable.
Incompatibilities
Can react with reducing agents to generate heat and products that may be gaseous (causing pressurization of closed containers) Can react violently with active metals, cyanides, esters, and thiocyanates.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Respiratory protection from chromic acid and chromates while fighting fires: Self-contained breathing apparatus with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or other positive pressure mode.
Fire potential
Nonflammable.

Health.
Exposure limit(s)
TLV (as Cr): ppm; 0.01 mg/m3 A1 (ACGIH 1992-1993).
Carcinogin
G-A1, I-1, N-1, CP65
Poison_Class
1*
Exposure effects
Hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema, and coma may occur. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been found to cross the placental barrier in hamsters and mice. Both were shown to enter the fetus during mid to late gestation. Developmental effects caused by both differed between hamster and mice. Fetal uptake of hexavalent chromium was much greater than that of the trivalent form. Effects on placental tissue could have also affected the fetus.
   Ingestion
Gastroenteritis and hemorrhage frequently occur immediately following oral ingestion.
   Inhalation
Pulmonary edema, pneumoconiosis, metal fume fever, and bronchial asthma may occur.
   Skin
Deep perforating ulcers and hypersensitivity dermatitis may be noted. Systemic toxicity has resulted from minimal dermal exposure.
   Eyes
Oral burns and severe corneal injury may result from acute exposure. Chronic inhalation produces deep perforating nasal ulcers (chrome holes).

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Induce vomiting, followed by prompt and complete gastric lavage, catharsis, and demulcents.
   Inhalation
Move to fresh air; if exposure has been severe, get medical attention.
   Skin
Wash thoroughly with soap and water.
   Eyes
Flush with water.

Transport.
USCG CHRIS Code
ZCR