Zinc dithionite

  • Zinc hydrosulfite
Formula
ZnS2O4
Structure
Description
Zinc dithionite is a white powder.
Uses
Bleach and reducing agent.

Registry Numbers and Inventories.
CAS
7779-86-4
EC (EINECS/ELINCS)
231-942-2
UN (DOT)
1931
Beilstein/Gmelin
139548 (G)
Canada DSL/NDSL
DSL
US TSCA
Listed
Austrailia AICS
Listed
Japan ENCS (MITI)
Listed
Korea ECL
Listed

Properties.
Formula
O4S2Zn
Formula mass
193.50

Hazards and Protection.
Storage
Keep containers tightly closed in a well ventilated area away from food products. Keep away from heat and water.
Handling
All chemicals should be considered hazardous. Avoid direct physical contact. Use appropriate, approved safety equipment. Untrained individuals should not handle this chemical or its container. Handling should occur in a chemical fume hood.
Protection
Protect against both inhalation and absorption through the skin. Must wear protective clothing including niosh approved rubber gloves and boots, safety goggles or face mask, and a respirator whose canister is specifically approved for this material. Care must be exercised to decontaminate fully or dispose of all equipment and clothing after use.
Respirators
Wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA).
Small spills/leaks
Do not use water. Keep material out of water sources and sewers. Land spill: Dig a pit, pond, lagoon, holding area to contain liquid or solid material. Cover solids with a plastic sheet to prevent dissolving in rain or fire fighting water. Water spill: Add calcium hypochlorite (Ca(ClO)2). Neutralize with agricultural lime (CaO), crushed limestone (CaCO3), or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). Use mechanical dredges or lifts to remove immobilized masses of pollutants and precipitates.
Stability
No data.
Incompatibilities
Can react explosively with strong oxidizing agents.

Fire.
Fire fighting
Use water only if flooding quantities are available. Use dry chemical, dry sand, or carbon dioxide.
Fire potential
Nonflammable.
Hazards
Containers may explode when heated.
Combustion products
Decomposes giving off irritating SO 2

Health.
Exposure effects
   Ingestion
Ingestion - zinc salts (especially zinc sulfate) produce gastritis ranging from a burning pain in the mouth and throat to intense gastric and substernal pain, strictures, violent vomiting, diarrhea, shock, and possible death.
   Inhalation
Inhalation of material may be harmful.
   Skin
Contact may cause burns.
   Eyes
See Skin.

First aid
 
   Ingestion
Corrosive salts - some zinc salts are highly corrosive and induced vomiting or gastric lavage should be avoided. With corrosive zinc salts, dilute rapidly with water or milk. Activated charcoal may be beneficial in patients exposed to salts of zinc that are not highly corrosive or following substantial ingestions of zinc tablet or capsule preparations. However, most lighter metals (including zinc) are not significantly adsorbed to activated charcoal. Activated charcoal: administer charcoal as a slurry (240 ml water/30 g charcoal). Usual dose: 25 to 100 g in adults/adolescents. Supportive care - maintain hydration and observe for metabolic acidosis, hypocalcemic tetany, anuria, liver damage, gastric perforation, and pyloric stenosis. Chelation - calcium disodium edetate and bal have been used following zinc overdose with mixed results.
   Inhalation
Move to fresh air.
   Skin
Wash with soap and water.
   Eyes
Zinc salts will precipitate protein in the eye and cause corneal and lens changes. Irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes. If irritation, pain, swelling, lacrimation, or photophobia persist, the patient should be seen in a health care facility. Rinsing with a 0.05 M neutral sodium edetate solution may help prevent or reverse a portion of the protein precipitation. An ophthalmologic examination is indicated in cases of direct eye exposure to all caustic zinc salts.

Transport.
UN number
1931
Response guide
Hazard class
9
Packing Group
III
 
USCG CHRIS Code
ZHS
 
Std. Transport #
4941195